whydoublel

on cultivating good literature

Everybody gets told to write about what they know. The trouble with many of us is that at the earlier stages of life we think we know everything — or to put it more usefully, we are often unaware of the scope and structure of our ignorance.

Thomas Pynchon 

I actually disagree with Pychon, as a writer, I am the precise opposite. I believe that I know nothing, so much that this belief in my own ignorance hinders me from putting pen to paper, fingertip to keyboard. I pay meticulous attention to write only what I know, and I am constantly in fear that I have ventured out of those boundaries, and that in doing so, whatever I write becomes false and trite. On a more optimistic note, however, while this mantra of ‘writing what I know about’ limits me, at the same time it propels me forward, because I deliberately try to know more things to write about. In other words, I am on a constant quest of self-enlightenment.

(via pavorst-deactivated20120105)

Tolerance and compromise - bred only by the people of the Arab Spring.

Tolerance and compromise - bred only by the people of the Arab Spring.

(Source: watchthewatchmen)

Brilliant. As much as I do maintain some level of political correctness, there is only so much of it that you can achieve. I enjoy Russell Peters. I laugh at harmless racist jokes. I am a feminist that chuckles when someone makes me go to the kitchen and conjure up a sandwich. Sometimes, you can only critique something when you point it out. When you satirize it.

Brilliant. As much as I do maintain some level of political correctness, there is only so much of it that you can achieve. I enjoy Russell Peters. I laugh at harmless racist jokes. I am a feminist that chuckles when someone makes me go to the kitchen and conjure up a sandwich. Sometimes, you can only critique something when you point it out. When you satirize it.

(Source: fallonsbabe)


A tribute to the Tunisian revolution in Paris.
I only discovered recently in French class that Tunisia and France have strong ties that extend to all areas of culture and social life. In Tunisia, for example, schools are bilingual and both French and Tunisian are taught. Conversely, in France, there is a thriving Tunisian immigrant community. It only seems natural therefore, that the French people (albeit not their government) are strongly supportive of the Tunisian cause and the efforts of the Arab Spring. After all, are they not calling for the same ideals, for democracy, for equality, for freedom, that the French once demanded two centuries ago?

A tribute to the Tunisian revolution in Paris.

I only discovered recently in French class that Tunisia and France have strong ties that extend to all areas of culture and social life. In Tunisia, for example, schools are bilingual and both French and Tunisian are taught. Conversely, in France, there is a thriving Tunisian immigrant community. It only seems natural therefore, that the French people (albeit not their government) are strongly supportive of the Tunisian cause and the efforts of the Arab Spring. After all, are they not calling for the same ideals, for democracy, for equality, for freedom, that the French once demanded two centuries ago?

(Source: padmila)

The Surgeon

This is a poem I wrote that was published in The Adroit Journal. I try not to explain the motives behind my poetry before they are read, so read ahead.

The Surgeon

 

He steps onto the porch, unlocks the front door. Night’s done,

it’s early morning and the sky is lit by pale sun.

 

Careful hours in the cold and sterile room he spent

standing by the table, bathed in the glow

of the overhead light, tongue between his teeth,

quiet, meticulous, his shoulders curved, brows furrowed.

In one hand he held a scalpel, in the other a

peach-sized heart, soft and wet like a newborn rabbit,

curled in the curve of his palm, four chambers like

four silk bags of ruby held with chains of amethyst.

Another life saved and another night passed. He walks

Into the living room, wife asleep upstairs,

Children holed in the nuances of their

Own lives; its been long since the day they ran to the door

asking whether or not Daddy fixed someone’s heart

today, it’s become stale, it’s become old, and so

standing by the table, bathed in the glow

of the kitchen light, he heats a bowl of last night’s

leftovers - white rice and cold soup - quiet and alone.

The world is simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.

Henry Miller 

Just another reminder not to be self-absorbed. Because there is so much in the world that isn’t you.

(via nirvikalpa-deactivated20130416)

Conveying, albeit humorously, the shared apprehension among global leaders as well as the ordinary person (what’s Kimmy’s son gonna do NOW?) towards the rise of Kim Jong Un

Conveying, albeit humorously, the shared apprehension among global leaders as well as the ordinary person (what’s Kimmy’s son gonna do NOW?) towards the rise of Kim Jong Un

(Source: spoopy-america)

great thinkers move in circles. if only to be annointed.

great thinkers move in circles. if only to be annointed.

(Source: euvelab)